February 2010

Jocelyn Tanner’s take on Y.E.S

February 26, 2010

A note from Jocelyn Tanner about her experiences with the Y.E.S. Conference.

Jocelyn Tanner

Jocelyn Tanner

My experience with the Youth Excellence Seminar and AQHYA Convention began seven years ago when I made my first trip to Amarillo, Texas for the 2003 Y.E.S. conference as one of my state’s affiliate AQHYA delegates.

I was in awe. All I could think was, wow, this is so exciting, and I am so happy to be part of this awesome organization. I have returned every year since. Unfortunately 2010 will be my last Y.E.S experience, but I want to continue to spread the word of the Read the rest of this entry »

Nights at the Museums;AQHA

February 26, 2010

Two Bits is ready for the spotlight tonight at Nights at the Museums!

This is the moment Two Bits has been waiting for all week!  He is all geared up and ready to roll tonight at the Nights at the Museums hosted by the American Quarter

Two Bits

Two Bits

Horse Hall of Fame & Museum.  He has been so excited that he’s running around like a pony with his tail cut off this morning, but don’t think just because Two Bits is busy that he forgot about you! Here’s the note he left!

Crazy about horses? Test your knowledge with AQHA’s Junior Master Horseman program. You can even earn certificates!

Hey Kids! There’s been lots of planning for tonight and I’m extremely excited to meet some new faces and hang out with a few old friends! There are a ton of activities planned and I promise there won’t be a dull moment all night! To tell you the truth, tonight is going to be so perfect that I’m just a little bit nervous! Before I make my appearance tonight I’ll go through my usual routine.  That is I’ll curry comb my mane and tail, drink 2 huge energy drinks, polish my hooves, put on some brand new horse shoes and do my pre-game dance to calm the nerves!
Hate to run y’all but there are still a ton of things to do!
See ya at the Museum!

P.S.
Parents- if you missed this month’s activities look for the Parent’s Night Out- Nights at the Museums again in October!

Page Impressive

February 26, 2010

He was a Blue-Ribbon stallion with a heart of gold.

After Greg and Page Impressive won at the Cow Palace, Page Impressive was retired to stud.

After Greg and Page Impressive won at the Cow Palace, Page Impressive was retired to stud.

By Honi Roberts in The American Quarter Horse Journal

When Greg and Mary Whalen sold their pretty sorrel mare Page Boys Pearl to Duane “Dude” Noble, they retained the first right of refusal on the mare’s first colt.

It proved to be stellar foresight after Dude’s daughter and their farm manager, Tommy Ryan, guided the fancy mare to three AQHA world championships, earning performance and halter points in a show career that included 60 grand and 14 reserve grand championships. The Whalens weren’t disappointed, either, when Dude bred her to Pretty Impressive. Read the rest of this entry »

Battle in the Saddle 2010

February 25, 2010

The great American western showdown begins July 6, 2010, in Oklahoma City.

Stay up to date with the latest information on one of the most exciting new horse events we’ve ever offered!

State Fair Park in Oklahoma City and AQHA have teamed up to present Battle in the Saddle.

On July 6-10, 2010, in Oklahoma City,  the world’s most talented horses and cowboys take center stage to battle for top honors at the first Battle in the Saddle competition.

Read the rest of this entry »

Foal CPR

February 25, 2010

Know what to do if your foal doesn’t breathe after birth.

Foals that survive after emergency birth resuscitation procedures are at risk of medical problems early in life.

Foals that survive after emergency birth resuscitation procedures are at risk of medical problems early in life.

By Patrick M. McCue in The American Quarter Horse Journal

Most newborn foals start breathing immediately after passage through the birth canal of the mare. However, some foals do not, and emergency resuscitation procedures might be needed.

Everyone involved in pregnant mare care and foaling should get annual training in normal foaling, obstetrical intervention, routine care of the newborn foal and birth resuscitation procedures. A foaling kit, resuscitation equipment, emergency procedure codes and phone numbers should be available. Read the rest of this entry »

All in Good Time

February 24, 2010

Meet an all-around amateur champion.

Twenty-six-year-old Kaleena Weakly and A Timely Promotion are the 2007 AQHA/Sooner Trailer All-Around Amateur champions.

Kaleena Weakly and A Timely Promotion are the 2007 AQHA Sooner Trailer All-Around Amateur champions.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

In February 2003, Kaleena Weakly sold her all-around horse and began searching for a new one.

Childhood friend Brynne Bassler sent her a video of A Timely Promotion, and Kaleena decided to make the drive to Iowa to check out the 2001 gelding.

“She had looked at several horses and a lot of videos,” says Kaleena’s husband, Josh. “She was definitely on a limited budget, and we knew we had to buy something that was fairly young. She, her mom, one of her mom’s friends and I went down to look at this horse and he was as green as a gourd.” Read the rest of this entry »

Slow Down to Go Fast: Part I

February 23, 2010

Cowboy, clinician and horseman Bryan Neubert shares his insight into starting ranch colts.

Bryan Neubert

Use Bryan Neubert's colt-starting techniques to get your ranch colt ready for the range.

By Bryan Neubert with Jim Bret Campbell in The American Quarter Horse Journal

This is the first part in a two-part series.

Bryan Neubert of Alturas, California, introduced his methods for starting ranch horses when he was 50. Neubert’s experience, gained through a lifetime of starting colts and honed by learning from such horsemen as Tom and Bill Dorrance and Ray Hunt, can help you get your horses better, faster.

Now, he tells how to make your colt’s first saddling and ride much less traumatic for both of you. Neubert says that depending on your horse, you could get to bridling and saddling in minutes, while other horses might take days. Read the rest of this entry »

Cooled vs. Frozen

February 22, 2010

How to make the best artificial insemination choices to make sure your older mare gets pregnant.

Question:

I have a breeding for an older mare (18 years old), who has previously taken successfully with frozen and fresh semen. With this breeding, we can choose fresh, cooled or frozen. Do you think her age will matter and, if so, which should we choose?

Answer:

The American Association of Equine Practitioners provides a practical answer:

It has been proven many, many times that older mares ovulate far inferior oocytes and develop much less viable embryos than they did when they were younger.

So, if you are starting with an 18-year-old mare, she is remarkable in that she is past what one would consider her Read the rest of this entry »

I’m No Dude!

February 22, 2010

Even so, a visit to a guest ranch can still feed your horse “fix.”

Most ranches offer more than just head-to-tail trail rides for those that want it. Riders at Lost Valley Ranch lope across a meadow overlooked by the Sheep Rock Dome.

Most ranches offer more than just head-to-tail trail rides for those that want it. Riders at Lost Valley Ranch lope across a meadow overlooked by the Sheep Rock Dome.

By Christine Hamilton in The American Quarter Horse Journal

What could be finer than a morning like this? Start with a breakfast of homemade pancakes, strong coffee and bacon. Then head down to the corral to saddle up a slick-haired ranch horse: sorrel, bay or buckskin, your pick. Set out on a trail loping across a meadow, splashing through a stream, climbing slopes of pine and aspen to catch a view of the backside of a 14,000-foot peak. Perfect.

That’s been part of what has attracted vacationers to guest “dude” ranches for decades now. In the last few years, however, ranches across the West have found their guests asking for more: They want a better communion with that sorrel, bay or buckskin carrying them through that scenery. Read the rest of this entry »

Something’s Missing

February 19, 2010

Two Bits and the Winter Olympics.

Two Bits has been watching the Winter Olympics all week and has enjoyed every minute of it!

He loves the thought of athletes from all over the world competing in events together. Of course, we know how competitive Two Bits is, so this isn’t too surprising.

Skijoring

Skijoring

To horse enthusiasts like you and Two Bits, the Winter Olympics aren’t exactly the best time to find a horse on TV, but that hasn’t always been the case.

The Winter Olympics used to include equestrian events. (Though he hasn’t turned his head from the TV yet, you can tell this is intriguing to Two Bits by the way his ears just perked up.) In 1928, two events were demonstrated at the Winter Olympic Games in Switzerland.

Flat racing, one of the events, was a horse race. In 1928, the track was set up on a frozen lake. (Now, we definitely have Two Bits’ attention!) Flat racing was a timed race, and horses are still raced on snow even today, just not at the Winter Olympics.

Crazy about horses? Test your knowledge with AQHA’s Junior Master Horseman program. You can even earn certificates!

Also in 1928, Skijoring was demonstrated.  Skijoring is an event still seen all over the world. Typically, there will be one person on horseback with a harness and ropes pulling another person on skis behind them.  Some courses will have jumps and other obstacles, and some will be a straight shot all the way to the finish line. In France, skijoring will often be done with no rider. The horse is controlled completely by the skier. Either way, the horse must be very well trained.

In 1948 in Switzerland, another event called the pentathlon took place. This event is actually five events combined.  Cross-country skiing, shooting, downhill skiing, fencing and horseback riding. Talk about a long busy day! (Two Bits looks tired just imagining it!)

Since then, equestrian events have been mostly reserved for the Summer Olympics. So, horse lovers, be sure to tune in for those next time!

Nights at the Museums:PPHM

February 19, 2010

Nights at the Museums is hosted by Panhandle Plains Historical Museum this week!

Two Bits is tired of hearing kids say how boring history is. So he has taken it upon himself to change a few minds. The Panhandle Plains Historical Museum is hosting Parents Night Out’s Nights at the Museums this week. If your kids aren’t enrolled for any of the events in February yet, time is running out!

Nights at the Museums Hosted by Panhandle Plains Museum this week!

Nights at the Museums Hosted by Panhandle Plains Museum this week!

Cost is $20 for the first child, and $15 for additional children. Limited spaces are available. Advance registration is required! For more information, contact Ande at the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum, (806) 378-4392.

February Lineup:

February 19 – Panhandle Plains Historical Museum

February 26 – American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum

Two Bits would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to a few of his important historical friends. Dash For Cash, Joe Hancock and a few others. Also some pretty important people like Quanah Parker and the people of the 6666 Ranch. Check out the presentation Two Bits made for you!

Crazy about horses? Test your knowledge with AQHA’s Junior Master Horseman program. You can even earn certificates!

As you can see, the 6666 Ranch and its families go way back! People’s family trees are very important, and sometime it’s interesting what you can find out about your own! Horses have pedigrees, which are a lot like family trees. This activity will explain a little more about pedigrees and even help you make your own family tree!

Here Comes Baby: Part IV

February 19, 2010

Brush up on what steps to take after the new baby arrives.

About 85 percent of antibodies are transferred to the foal in the first six to eight hours, so your veterinarian should check the foal at that time to ensure that everything is normal.

About 85 percent of antibodies are transferred to the foal in the first six to eight hours, so your veterinarian should check the foal at that time to ensure that everything is normal.

By Andrea Caudill in the Q-Racing section of The American Quarter Horse Journal

This is the last of the four-part series. Need to review Part 1, Part 2 or Part 3?

After the Big Event

  • Follow the 1-2-3 Rule. When the foal has arrived normally, remember:
  1. By one hour he should be standing.
  2. By two hours, he should be nursing aggressively.
  3. By three hours, the mare should have passed the placenta.

Any of these things not happening is a cause for alarm. If the foal is normal, you should begin considering the timing of his first checkup. Don’t turn the baby out until he has had his checkup.

Read the rest of this entry »