Free Reports

Top 10 Free Reports

April 7, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack Free ReportsDo you have a newborn foal ready to start the beginning horse-training steps? What about that horse that needs a refresher on loading into the horse trailer? No problem!

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this spring! Read the rest of this entry »

Top 10 Free Reports

March 4, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

ATwobitTeeblackre you trying to figure out the color of your newborn foal? What about that horse that needs a refresher on horse-training fundamentals? No problem! America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this spring!

  1. Horse Color and Markings Chart - The 17 AQHA recognized colors and variety of markings can seem overwhelming, but they don’t have to be. AQHA makes it easy with this easy-to-use chart. Get descriptions and photos of horse colors, markings and more.
  2. Riding Dressage - AQHA Professional Horsewoman and Certified Horsemanship Association master instructor Carla Wennberg offers nine fundamental lessons that any equine can benefit from. Read the rest of this entry »

Horse Trailer Loading Tips

March 3, 2014

Training for the trailer requires time and patience.

It’s easy to lose your temper when teaching a horse to load in a trailer. Unfortunately, getting impatient is the worst thing you can do.

The late Bill Van Norman insists that you need to take your time and keep your temper when teaching your horse to trailer load.

Bill offers his valuable advice in AQHA’s FREE report, Horse Trailer Loading Tips.

To begin training your horse to trailer load, Bill suggests these tips:

  • Send your horse in a circle around you directly behind the open trailer.
  • Use a lead rope, not a longe line, so you can keep your horse fairly close to you.
  • If your horse wants to stop and smell the trailer or look inside, encourage this behavior and recognize it as a sign that he’s trying.
  • When his attention fades off the trailer, ask your horse to move out again and continue circling you.
  • Circle in both directions behind the trailer to help him become comfortable with being worked from either side.

“I have a 3-year-old Quarter Horse mare named Channel, and she has always been very difficult to load and I have tried everything. But I tried what you suggested in this article and, like magic, she got right in! It is so great to not have to worry anymore about how I would get her to the vet if she got sick or injured. Last winter, during a snowstorm, she would not get in the trailer so I could take her into town for a vet check of her eye injury. It’s good to know that if something like that happens again I should be able to get that rascal in the trailer! Thank you!”

Daily reader Greg Cooper

Get the full story in Horse Trailer Loading Tips from AQHA – FREE!

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Top 10 Free Reports

February 7, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Are you rusty on horse conformation and need a refresher before the judging season? What about that horse that doesn’t want to load in the trailer after a winter break? No problem!

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this spring! Read the rest of this entry »

Trail Ride Safety Tips

January 16, 2014

Stay safe on the trails!

Trail riding is one of the most rewarding and relaxing activities you can do with a horse. It gets you both out of the arena, experiencing new sights, and breaks up a monotonous training routine. But it is not without its dangers.

AQHA’s FREE Trail Safety Tips report will keep you and your Quarter Horse out of harm’s way when you’re on the trail.

Experts on three different areas of trail riding offer tips and advice on how to better enjoy trail riding while keeping your horse’s health and the environment in mind.

Veterinarian Rick Hill discusses how to deal with emergencies on the trail such as cuts, thrown shoes, colic and infection.

“You are not going to take the same things for a one-hour trip like you would if you were going to be gone for three or four days. It’s going to depend on how long a ride is, and how far you are going to be away, the more you are going to want to be able to handle anything you might be facing,” Dr. Hill says.

Hoof care is extremely important when you are trekking out in the open, and Doug Butler, professor of equine sciences at Colorado State University and renowned farrier, has advice to keep things moving smoothly.

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“One thing all trail riders are concerned with is what to do if their horse throws a shoe while on the trail,” Doug notes.

The FREE Trail Safety Tips report guides you through your options for shoeing your horse so he can negotiate the trail better.

Finally, we must protect our precious wilderness areas so that future generations can enjoy them as we have. Mark DeGregorio of the Rocky Mountain National Park explains minimal impact trail riding, more commonly known as “Leave No Trace.”

“What we mean by minimal impact is you are going to try to do your best to have the least impact you can on that land,” Mark says.

Learn helpful tips for leaving your favorite trails as beautiful as when you found them.

Mark sums up his thoughts on minimal impact with a quote he calls the horseman’s creed, ‘When I go into the back country, I will leave only hoofprints, take only memories.”

This report is a must-have for all trail riders. Download, print and share it today!

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HYPP Survival Guide

January 6, 2014

How to be prepared for and deal with a horse affected by HYPP.

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a serious muscle deficiency in horses that causes muscle twitching, weakness and more.

Learn all about this dominant genetic disease in AQHA’s FREE HYPP Survival Guide report.

In 1996, AQHA designated HYPP a genetic defect and undesirable trait. Two years later, the Association added that all Impressive-descendent foals born after January 1, 1998, were required to be tested for the disease and parentage verified for registration, with the results placed on the registration certificate. Since 2007, any horses tested as H/H are not accepted for registration with AQHA. Find out why in the HYPP Survival Guide.

Also in this detailed report,  you’ll learn:

  • Definitions of HYPP’s three designations: H/H, N/H, and N/N.
  • Symptoms of HYPP
  • Prevention tips
  • Signs of an attack and what to do to keep your horse safe
  • Feeding suggestions for HYPP-positive horses
  • How to test your horse for HYPP

The most-common symptoms of HYPP include muscle tremors, weakness, muscle cramping, yawning, depression, an inability to relax the muscles, sweating, prolapse of the third eyelid, noisy breathing and/or abnormal sounds or whinnies.

HYPP cases usually start with muscle weakness and prolapse of the third eyelid, sweating and minor tremors most commonly in the flank, neck and shoulders.

More severe attacks can involve severe weakness, high heart and respitory rate, staggering, dog sitting and collapse. In its most extreme form, HYPP can lead to collapse and death, usually from a heart attack or respiratory failure.

Be prepared for situations involving HYPP-positive horses by downloading the HYPP Survival Guide today. This FREE report will give you the knowledge to identify symptoms and react accordingly to a horse experiencing an attack. You’ll also learn steps to preventing HYPP attacks, such as stopping frequently on road trips to give your horses a break and reduce their stress levels.

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Top 10 FREE Reports

December 13, 2013

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Are you registering your first foal and need a handy guide to American Quarter Horse markings and colors? Maybe you’re spending time indoors out of the gloomy weather with do-it-yourself projects and need some ideas. Learn how to make mounting blocks, how to tie halters and more with AQHA’s popular, downloadable reports.

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this Fall.

  1. Horse Color and Markings ChartThe 17 AQHA recognized colors and variety of markings can become overwhelming, but they don’t have to be. AQHA makes it easy with this easy-to-use chart. Get descriptions and photos of horse colors, markings and more.
  2. Coat Color GeneticsCoat color genetics don’t have to be mystery. AQHA makes it easy with a comprehensive report that helps horse owners learn the difference between difficult colors, such as buckskin and dun, as well as help determine the future color of a foal based on genetics.
  3. Horse Wound CareAre you prepared to handle all of the cuts, bumps, scrapes and wounds that your horse will inevitably throw at you? Educate yourself with this report to know when to call a vet or when to treat an injury at home. You’ll learn the components of a proper first-aid kit and have access to a five-step picture guide on how to bandage minor leg wounds.
  4. Laminitis TreatmentLaminitis, an often dreaded prognosis for horse owners, refers to inflammation of the laminae. And guess what — it’s treatable! Dr. Michael Steward, a vet from Shawnee, Oklahoma, explains the success that he has found in placing wooden shoes on laminitic horses. Learn more in this report.
  5. How to Make a Rope HalterRope halters are practical, inexpensive and a great training tool. Two experts at Columbia Basin Knot company share their step-by-step process so that you, too, can build your own knotted rope halter for your horses.
  6. How to Build a Mounting BlockSometimes you just need a leg up. Why spend money on a mounting block when you can easily make a personalized one of your very own. AQHA consulted a woodworking expert for easy-to-follow, beginner instructions for building a homemade mounting block. It’s a must-have for any barn!
  7. HYPP Survival GuideThe HYPP trait is demystified in this report. You’ll learn HYPP’s three designations, the symptoms, prevention, feeding instructions and how to test for this genetic defect.
  8. Horse Trailer Loading TipsPatience is the name of the game when teaching a horse to trailer load. In this report, the late Bill Van Norman offers helpful advice for those trailer training a horse for the very first time.
  9. Horse Training Fundamentals -AQHA Professional Horseman Ken McNabb teaches the basics in groundwork, collection, shoulder control and other techniques useful for horses of all ages and stages. Whether you’re a serious competitor, a weekend warrior or leisurely trail rider, you can benefit from these essential tips.
  10. Showmanship BasicsTrainers Brad and Valerie Keams give you tips and tricks about every aspect of showmanship from basic maneuvers to picking out the right show halter for your horse.

There are even more FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily. Download, enjoy them and share with a friend!

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Laminitis Treatment

November 25, 2013

The wooden rocking horseshoe is helping many horses survive laminitis.

Laminitis is a medical emergency that, unfortunately, many horses are subjected to.

What is laminitis, exactly?

According to the American Association of Equine Practitioners, laminitis results from the disruption (constant, intermittent or short-term) of blood flow to the sensitive and insensitive laminae. These laminae structures within the foot secure the coffin bone (the wedge-shaped bone within the foot) to the hoof wall. Inflammation often permanently weakens the laminae and interferes with the wall/bone bond. In severe cases, the bone and the hoof wall can separate. In these situations, the coffin bone may rotate within the foot, be displaced downward, “sink” and eventually penetrate the sole. Laminitis can affect one or all feet, but it is most often seen in the front feet concurrently.

The terms “laminitis” and “founder” are used interchangeably. However, founder usually refers to a chronic (long-term) condition associated with rotation of the coffin bone. Acute laminitis refers to symptoms associated with a sudden initial attack, including pain and inflammation of the laminae.

Luckily, there are a few options to help ease the suffering for horses with laminitis. Learn about one, the wooden rocking horseshoe, in AQHA’s FREE report, Laminitis Treatment.

In Laminitis Treatment, Dr. Micheal Steward, a veterinarian in Shawnee, Oklahoma, explains how he finds success with placing wooden shoes on laminitic horses. The shoes, he says, help support the hoof and help it heal.

You’ll also get a detailed explanation, including diagrams, of exactly how laminitis affects a horse’s foot and leg.

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In Laminitis Treatment, you’ll hear a first-hand story about how Dr. Steward’s technique took a critically ill horse and gave him renewed life:

When ‘Tooter’ Kiser took his good ranch horse, Pepperoani Wolf, to Dr. Steward, the little red roan gelding could barely walk off the trailer. But by the time Dr. Steward and a farrier finished with him, “I led that horse out of that X-ray room and he hit that concrete and gravel, and he just gave a little. It was like he was already 95-percent better,” Tooter says.

Get the full details on how Pepperoani went from almost being euthanized to returning to the ranch as a full-time helper.

Plus, get other tips for keeping horses with laminitis comfortable and happy.

Download your free copy of Laminitis Treatment today, and share it with your friends!

Top 10 FREE Reports

November 5, 2013

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Are you registering your first foal and need a handy guide to American Quarter Horse markings and colors? Maybe you’re spending time indoors out of the gloomy weather with do-it-yourself projects and need some ideas. Learn how to make mounting blocks, how to tie halters and more with AQHA’s popular, downloadable reports.

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this Fall.

  1. Read the rest of this entry »

Top 10 Free Reports

October 4, 2013

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Have a chubby horse that you need to peel weight off of? Want to learn to make your own rope halters for training? Or maybe, you’re planning to register your first quarter horse this year and want some advice on what AQHA recognized color to choose for their papers. No sweat!

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this summer

  1. Horse Color and Markings ChartThe AQHA Horse Color and Markings Chart contains a wealth of knowledge on everything from stripes to chestnuts in one easy-to-use and store packet.
  2. Chubby HorsesThe Chubby Horses report examines some of the findings of a study done which documented the problems associated with overweight horses. Equip yourself with the tools to combat the plague of the chubby horse in this report.
  3. How to Build a Mounting BlockAQHA consulted an expert woodworker for a homemade mounting block that can become a staple for your barn aisle or arena.
  4. How to Make a Rope HalterTwo experts at Columbia Basin Knot Company shares their 34-step process for making a quality homemade rope halter. The How to Make a Rope Halter is complete with pictures and easy-to-follow steps.
  5. Quarter Horse Coat Color GeneticsLearn all of the approved American Quarter Horse colors and infinite possibilities for your future foals. Download Coat Color Genetics for easy-to-understand explanations of all 17 AQHA recognized colors and color genetics information.
  6. Cowboy EtiquetteThe AQHA Cowboy Etiquette report defines proper range conduct, safety, how to work around a horse and proper ranch etiquette. This guide instills the practical skills needed to live the “cowboy way.”
  7. Rainy Day Rewards - AQHA Professional Horseman Brent Graef offered valuable barn-aisle exercise for training during the winter months and less-than-ideal weather conditions.
  8. Horse Trailer Loading TipsTraining a horse for the trailer requires time and patience. Bill Van Norman suggests some tips to make the process easier.
  9. Laminitis TreatmentIn Laminitis Treatment, veterinarian Micheal Steward explains how he finds success with lacing wooden shoes on laminitic horses.
  10. HYPP Survival GuideIn AQHA’s HYPP Survival Guide report learn to deal with a horse affected by this genetic defect. This detailed report will outline symptoms, prevention and even feeding suggestions for HYPP-positive horses.

There are more FREE reports where these came from! Check them out today!

Riding Lessons With Richard Shrake

September 30, 2013

AQHA Professional Horseman Richard Shrake helps you develop a better relationship with your horse in this four-part series.

We all want to become better riders, improving our rhythm, form, confidence and so much more. AQHA Professional Horseman Richard Shrake gets you started in the right direction toward a better relationship with your horse in AQHA’s FREE Riding Lessons with Richard Shrake report.

In this amazing free report, Richard explains how riding a horse uses skills you already know, citing examples from golf, tennis and more.

Richard explains:

  • The importance of rhythm
  • Why timing is crucial to good riding
  • How precision and form work together to create a well-rounded rider
  • Confidence-building techniques
  • Breathing exercises
  • Plus all kinds of great drills and courses to help solidify your newfound techniques

Richard offers lots of rich, heartwarming examples within the Riding Lessons with Richard Shrake report.

“Megan has a brand-new horse, and she’s having trouble bonding with him. She’s starting to lose interest in riding,” Richard says. “Megan needs to realize that this horse needs to be like a best friend. She can’t blame him for his reactionary, sensitive attitude. She needs to find a way to make him a good friend – someone she’d like to be around all the time.”

Richard suggests a steady routine to help Megan with her situation:

  • Catch your horse’s eye
  • Release endorphins – the “feel good” hormones in every animal; in a horse, you can rub his ears, poll and cheeks
  • Halter your horse
  • Get your horse in “herd mode”

Learn more about these techniques now by downloading your FREE copy of Riding Lessons with Richard Shrake.

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Do you know what it means when your horse lifts his head, hollows his back and gets stiff? Richard explains, “This means your horse is protectign himself, the same as  you would if someone walked up and hit you with a hard punch. Your horse is saying, ‘Whoops, you just smacked me before you told me what you were going to do.’ ” In this report, Richard shows you how to watch for signs from  your horse that you’re moving too fast for him. He shows you how to slow down your hands and rhythm to make your horse more comfortable and less sensitive.

In his section explaining the importance of rhythm, Richard says, “If you stand relaxed with one arm in the air and stomp your foot, you can feel the energy flow all the way from your foot to your fingertips. But if you stand with your jaw clenched and stomp your foot, the vibration ends at your tight jaw. If you have that same rigidity in your body, you’ll interrupt the rhythm from your horse’s gaits.”

Download Riding Lessons with Richard Shrake to learn the next step in improving your rhythm.

Cowboy Etiquette

September 10, 2013

This free report teaches you old-time manners.

Paula Cole once asked the very astute question: where have all the cowboys gone? Today’s ropers, ranchers and cattle enthusiasts are more likely to be investment bankers than professional hands. As the ranching population ages and rural youth move to cities, true cowboys are becoming a rare find.

While the natural horsemanship revolution has revitalized the horse-training methods of the old west, what has become of rules for cowboy etiquette?

Cowboy etiquette is defined as proper range conduct when working livestock, with an emphasis on respect and safety. Just as it is important for a cowboy to know how to work around his horse, he must know how to work with his team.

AQHA’s Cowboy Etiquette report, brought to you by America's Horse, is the perfect guide for aspiring and professional cowboys. This fun and useful guide will help everyone learn how to manage the chaos of a working ranch.

The Cowboy Etiquette report lays out the rules of the ranch, which are generally set in stone, such as:

  • When cattle are being sorted outside, hold the herd together in a group. Don’t start sorting without being asked.
  • Never assume a position. The “cowboy way” is to say: “I’ll do any job that needs doing.” Be willing to do the job that needs to be done, but don’t take on a task you are not qualified for. When moving cattle, ride drag – that’s located at the back of the herd. Don’t promote yourself to wing or lead.
  • Don’t criticize a man’s horse, cattle or dog.

The guide includes a special section for ropers. Learn how you can make the ground crew’s job easier and safer.

  • All roper’s go through dry spells, but if you are simply not getting calves, you need to let someone else rope. And always control your temper. Too often, ropers who are not roping well will get frustrated and blame their horses.
  • Keep the herd quiet. Don’t get stubborn about getting a particular calf. Rope the one that’s handy.

Download the Cowboy Etiquette report today and impress your crew with your knowledge of old-time manners.

cowboy_etiquetteDownload the Cowboy Etiquette report for FREE!

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