Free Reports

Top 10 Free Reports

May 6, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack Free ReportsDo you have a newborn foal with a puzzling color? What about that horse that needs a quick clip before your next horse show? No problem!

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast with your horses as we head into summer! Read the rest of this entry »

Dressage-Based Exercise

May 2, 2014

Enjoy this FREE excerpt from a popular horse-training book.

Learn a dressage-based exercise created by Ellen Eckstein and Tom Dorrance that teaches your horse the beginning of self carriage.

In this FREE 15-page booklet, you’ll learn the Reach Forward Exercise.

This exercise progresses from the horse stepping out, in a type of turn on the forehand, with large confident steps from behind, to stepping under and forward with large confident steps from behind. It also explains to the horse that when the rider reaches for the rein, the rider wants activity. That the rider wants the horse to come from behind, and step up to the rider’s light hand.

Download your FREE excerpt from “Bringing It Together.”

Just enter your name and email address below.

EVA: A Manageable Problem

April 21, 2014

Equine viral arteritis in horses is manageable.

Learn why Dr. Joe Manning of Sports Medicine Services in Weatherford, Texas, says, “EVA has significant implications from the standpoint of the breeding business,” in this FREE report from The American Quarter Horse Racing Journal library.

Although EVA is rarely lethal to horses, it can play havoc with your breeding program, as its greatest danger lies in mares aborting their pregnancies. Find out how you can protect your mares and breeding program through this report.

Here’s what you’ll learn in this great FREE report:

  • What EVA is
  • Symptoms of EVA
  • Treatment and Prevention of EVA
  • Transportation and quarantine
  • Top things to remember about EVA

EVA is passed by direct horse-to-horse contact but can be transferred through indirect means such as shared equipment and handlers. Mares, geldings and sexually immature stallions will be able to shed the virus shortly after they acquire it. Sexually mature stallions can become carriers of the virus, as EVA is a testosterone-dependent virus.

Along with Dr. Manning’s professional advice, he is joined by Peter Timoney, a professor and researcher at the Gluck Equine Research Center in Lexington, Kentucky.

“EVA is the only known testosterone- or androgen-dependent carrier state that I’m aware of among mammalian viruses. That’s why it only occurs in the intact, sexually mature male,” says Timoney.

EVA is a resilient virus and can survive and still be transferred through chilled and frozen semen, making it a huge threat when shipping semen for artificial insemination.

How do you find out if your horse is EVA positive? EVA: A Manageable Problem, walks you through the different tests and scenarios of positive and elevated readings. You’ll learn how to determine whether a horse is contagious.

Take the next step and learn how to protect your horse from contracting EVA, therefore preventing any losses in your breeding program from this manageable virus. The FREE EVA: A Manageable Problem report discusses the vaccine by Pfizer Animal Health and proper administration practices.

International horse traffic is also discussed and options are weighted as some countries have stricter regulations regarding elevated levels of the antibodies. Be able to make an educated decision on what is best for your horses and your breeding program.

Become knowledgeable on all proper isolation and quarantine methods and when to apply them within your breeding program to prevent an EVA outbreak.

Don’t let EVA interfere with your breeding program. EVA: A Manageable Problem will bring you up to speed with what this virus is all about, how to keep it away from your horses and what to do if you do come into contact with EVA.

Download the EVA: A Manageable Problem Report for FREE!

Just enter your name and email address below.

Top 10 Free Reports

April 7, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack Free ReportsDo you have a newborn foal ready to start the beginning horse-training steps? What about that horse that needs a refresher on loading into the horse trailer? No problem!

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this spring! Read the rest of this entry »

Top 10 Free Reports

March 4, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

ATwobitTeeblackre you trying to figure out the color of your newborn foal? What about that horse that needs a refresher on horse-training fundamentals? No problem! America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this spring!

  1. Horse Color and Markings Chart - The 17 AQHA recognized colors and variety of markings can seem overwhelming, but they don’t have to be. AQHA makes it easy with this easy-to-use chart. Get descriptions and photos of horse colors, markings and more.
  2. Riding Dressage - AQHA Professional Horsewoman and Certified Horsemanship Association master instructor Carla Wennberg offers nine fundamental lessons that any equine can benefit from. Read the rest of this entry »

Horse Trailer Loading Tips

March 3, 2014

Training for the trailer requires time and patience.

It’s easy to lose your temper when teaching a horse to load in a trailer. Unfortunately, getting impatient is the worst thing you can do.

The late Bill Van Norman insists that you need to take your time and keep your temper when teaching your horse to trailer load.

Bill offers his valuable advice in AQHA’s FREE report, Horse Trailer Loading Tips.

To begin training your horse to trailer load, Bill suggests these tips:

  • Send your horse in a circle around you directly behind the open trailer.
  • Use a lead rope, not a longe line, so you can keep your horse fairly close to you.
  • If your horse wants to stop and smell the trailer or look inside, encourage this behavior and recognize it as a sign that he’s trying.
  • When his attention fades off the trailer, ask your horse to move out again and continue circling you.
  • Circle in both directions behind the trailer to help him become comfortable with being worked from either side.

“I have a 3-year-old Quarter Horse mare named Channel, and she has always been very difficult to load and I have tried everything. But I tried what you suggested in this article and, like magic, she got right in! It is so great to not have to worry anymore about how I would get her to the vet if she got sick or injured. Last winter, during a snowstorm, she would not get in the trailer so I could take her into town for a vet check of her eye injury. It’s good to know that if something like that happens again I should be able to get that rascal in the trailer! Thank you!”

Daily reader Greg Cooper

Get the full story in Horse Trailer Loading Tips from AQHA – FREE!

Get this report FREE!

Download the Horse Trailer Loading Tips report for FREE!

Just enter your name and e-mail address below.

Top 10 Free Reports

February 7, 2014

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Are you rusty on horse conformation and need a refresher before the judging season? What about that horse that doesn’t want to load in the trailer after a winter break? No problem!

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this spring! Read the rest of this entry »

Trail Ride Safety Tips

January 16, 2014

Stay safe on the trails!

Trail riding is one of the most rewarding and relaxing activities you can do with a horse. It gets you both out of the arena, experiencing new sights, and breaks up a monotonous training routine. But it is not without its dangers.

AQHA’s FREE Trail Safety Tips report will keep you and your Quarter Horse out of harm’s way when you’re on the trail.

Experts on three different areas of trail riding offer tips and advice on how to better enjoy trail riding while keeping your horse’s health and the environment in mind.

Veterinarian Rick Hill discusses how to deal with emergencies on the trail such as cuts, thrown shoes, colic and infection.

“You are not going to take the same things for a one-hour trip like you would if you were going to be gone for three or four days. It’s going to depend on how long a ride is, and how far you are going to be away, the more you are going to want to be able to handle anything you might be facing,” Dr. Hill says.

Hoof care is extremely important when you are trekking out in the open, and Doug Butler, professor of equine sciences at Colorado State University and renowned farrier, has advice to keep things moving smoothly.

Trail Ride Safety Download the Trail Ride Safety Tips report for FREE!

Just enter your name and email address below.

http://buyessayonlinecheap.com/

“One thing all trail riders are concerned with is what to do if their horse throws a shoe while on the trail,” Doug notes.

The FREE Trail Safety Tips report guides you through your options for shoeing your horse so he can negotiate the trail better.

Finally, we must protect our precious wilderness areas so that future generations can enjoy them as we have. Mark DeGregorio of the Rocky Mountain National Park explains minimal impact trail riding, more commonly known as “Leave No Trace.”

“What we mean by minimal impact is you are going to try to do your best to have the least impact you can on that land,” Mark says.

Learn helpful tips for leaving your favorite trails as beautiful as when you found them.

Mark sums up his thoughts on minimal impact with a quote he calls the horseman’s creed, ‘When I go into the back country, I will leave only hoofprints, take only memories.”

This report is a must-have for all trail riders. Download, print and share it today!

jfdghjhthit45

HYPP Survival Guide

January 6, 2014

How to be prepared for and deal with a horse affected by HYPP.

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a serious muscle deficiency in horses that causes muscle twitching, weakness and more.

Learn all about this dominant genetic disease in AQHA’s FREE HYPP Survival Guide report.

In 1996, AQHA designated HYPP a genetic defect and undesirable trait. Two years later, the Association added that all Impressive-descendent foals born after January 1, 1998, were required to be tested for the disease and parentage verified for registration, with the results placed on the registration certificate. Since 2007, any horses tested as H/H are not accepted for registration with AQHA. Find out why in the HYPP Survival Guide.

Also in this detailed report,  you’ll learn:

  • Definitions of HYPP’s three designations: H/H, N/H, and N/N.
  • Symptoms of HYPP
  • Prevention tips
  • Signs of an attack and what to do to keep your horse safe
  • Feeding suggestions for HYPP-positive horses
  • How to test your horse for HYPP

The most-common symptoms of HYPP include muscle tremors, weakness, muscle cramping, yawning, depression, an inability to relax the muscles, sweating, prolapse of the third eyelid, noisy breathing and/or abnormal sounds or whinnies.

HYPP cases usually start with muscle weakness and prolapse of the third eyelid, sweating and minor tremors most commonly in the flank, neck and shoulders.

More severe attacks can involve severe weakness, high heart and respitory rate, staggering, dog sitting and collapse. In its most extreme form, HYPP can lead to collapse and death, usually from a heart attack or respiratory failure.

Be prepared for situations involving HYPP-positive horses by downloading the HYPP Survival Guide today. This FREE report will give you the knowledge to identify symptoms and react accordingly to a horse experiencing an attack. You’ll also learn steps to preventing HYPP attacks, such as stopping frequently on road trips to give your horses a break and reduce their stress levels.

Download the HYPP Survival Guide Report for FREE!

Just enter your name and email address below.

Top 10 FREE Reports

December 13, 2013

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Are you registering your first foal and need a handy guide to American Quarter Horse markings and colors? Maybe you’re spending time indoors out of the gloomy weather with do-it-yourself projects and need some ideas. Learn how to make mounting blocks, how to tie halters and more with AQHA’s popular, downloadable reports.

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this Fall. Read the rest of this entry »

Laminitis Treatment

November 25, 2013

The wooden rocking horseshoe is helping many horses survive laminitis.

Laminitis is a medical emergency that, unfortunately, many horses are subjected to.

What is laminitis, exactly?

According to the American Association of Equine Practitioners, laminitis results from the disruption (constant, intermittent or short-term) of blood flow to the sensitive and insensitive laminae. These laminae structures within the foot secure the coffin bone (the wedge-shaped bone within the foot) to the hoof wall. Inflammation often permanently weakens the laminae and interferes with the wall/bone bond. In severe cases, the bone and the hoof wall can separate. In these situations, the coffin bone may rotate within the foot, be displaced downward, “sink” and eventually penetrate the sole. Laminitis can affect one or all feet, but it is most often seen in the front feet concurrently.

The terms “laminitis” and “founder” are used interchangeably. However, founder usually refers to a chronic (long-term) condition associated with rotation of the coffin bone. Acute laminitis refers to symptoms associated with a sudden initial attack, including pain and inflammation of the laminae.

Luckily, there are a few options to help ease the suffering for horses with laminitis. Learn about one, the wooden rocking horseshoe, in AQHA’s FREE report, Laminitis Treatment.

In Laminitis Treatment, Dr. Micheal Steward, a veterinarian in Shawnee, Oklahoma, explains how he finds success with placing wooden shoes on laminitic horses. The shoes, he says, help support the hoof and help it heal.

You’ll also get a detailed explanation, including diagrams, of exactly how laminitis affects a horse’s foot and leg.

Download the Laminitis Treatment Report for FREE!

Just enter your name and email address below.

In Laminitis Treatment, you’ll hear a first-hand story about how Dr. Steward’s technique took a critically ill horse and gave him renewed life:

When ‘Tooter’ Kiser took his good ranch horse, Pepperoani Wolf, to Dr. Steward, the little red roan gelding could barely walk off the trailer. But by the time Dr. Steward and a farrier finished with him, “I led that horse out of that X-ray room and he hit that concrete and gravel, and he just gave a little. It was like he was already 95-percent better,” Tooter says.

Get the full details on how Pepperoani went from almost being euthanized to returning to the ranch as a full-time helper.

Plus, get other tips for keeping horses with laminitis comfortable and happy.

Download your free copy of Laminitis Treatment today, and share it with your friends!

Top 10 FREE Reports

November 5, 2013

Check out the 10 most popular FREE reports on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Are you registering your first foal and need a handy guide to American Quarter Horse markings and colors? Maybe you’re spending time indoors out of the gloomy weather with do-it-yourself projects and need some ideas. Learn how to make mounting blocks, how to tie halters and more with AQHA’s popular, downloadable reports.

America’s Horse Daily has dozens of FREE reports to help you become a better rider, trainer, competitor and horse owner. Download as many free reports as you’d like, and print copies for your barn, home and trailer. Share them with family and friends, and have a blast in the barn this Fall.

  1. Read the rest of this entry »