Horse Showing

Eight Smart Tips for Hunter Under Saddle

May 21, 2014

Learn how to cruise the ring correctly with this horse-showing advice.

Finding your position in a hunter under saddle class is easy as long as you look to the rail says AQHA Professional Horsewoman Deanna Searles

Finding your position in a hunter under saddle class is easy, as long as you look to the rail, says AQHA Professional Horsewoman Deanna Searles. Journal photo.

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Deanna Searles

At the 2012 AQHA Select World Championship Show, AQHA Professional Horsewoman Deanna Searles of Scottsdale, Arizona offered tricks and tips for horse showing in the hunter under saddle class. Heed these eight tricks so you can succeed in the show pen: Read the rest of this entry »

Horse-Showing Style: Chaps

May 14, 2014

Identify the dos and don’ts of picking and caring for your next set of chaps.

Choosing chaps for the horse show

Your choice in chaps can make or break the overall appearance you present to the judge at your next horse show. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

In the overall picture you present to the judge, there’s one major part of your outfit that can make or break your image. Your chaps are a throwback to the cowboy days of protecting your legs from brambles, and they’ve come a long way since the era of the buckaroo. Today, your legwear helps present a smooth and polished position in the saddle.

But without proper fit or style, you’ll be putting yourself at a disadvantage before you ever get to your pattern. Read on to learn how to choose the right chaps, make sure they fit and care for your investment in the cowhide. Read the rest of this entry »

A Break From Horse Showing

May 7, 2014

In Part 2 of this series, discover six more exercises that will keep your show horse fresh and prepare him for a trail ride.

Taking your show horse for a jaunt in the great outdoors is a necessary venture that requires preparation ahead of time

Taking your show horse for a jaunt in the great outdoors is a necessary venture that requires preparation ahead of time. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Keep your show horses fresh this show season by venturing into the trails. Last week, accomplished clinician Marty Marten of Berthoud, Colorado, shared three horseback-riding obstacles that will prepare your show horse for a trail ride. Review the first three obstacles and trail-prep fundamentals in Part 1.

In Part 2, Marty offers six more obstacles that will offer your horse-showing star a break from the show ring. Read the rest of this entry »

A Break From Horse Showing

April 30, 2014

In Part 1 of this series, discover three trail-riding obstacles that will keep your show horse fresh.

Training your horse showing star for the trails starts with proper prep at home

Training your horse-showing star for the trails starts with proper prep at home. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Don’t be surprised if your world champion who glides over jumps like a gazelle in the show ring refuses to step over a log in the wide-open spaces. It’s a whole different duck.

To a horse, if it looks different, it is different. It’s crucial to keep this in mind and carefully prepare your show horse at home before hitting the trails.

“If you have a horse who’s used to a routine, like a pleasure class, and you head out to do something different, you might find out how well he is not broke,” explains Marty Marten, an accomplished horse clinician. “Surrounded by fences, you can get away with a lot of things, but it’s a new ball game out in the wide open.”

However, he believes there’s nothing better to keep a horse fresh than cattle work or trail riding. Read the rest of this entry »

Safety Tips for Horse Showing Success

April 23, 2014

Whether you’re a horse-show exhibitor or the person in charge, these smart show safety tips can help everyone stay safe at the show.

At a horse show an individuals actions can affect the performance of other exhibitors But if you take certain precautions youll be a positive addition to any horse showing event

At a horse show, an individual’s actions can affect the performance of other exhibitors. But if you take certain precautions, you’ll be a positive addition to any horse-showing event. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Although horse showing is typically a fun experience for both horses and competitors, it does not come without risks. The Journal gathered tips for exhibitors and show management to maximize the chances of a safe horse-show experience.

Advice for Exhibitors

As an exhibitor, you have an influence on how smoothly a show runs. Enlist these 11 tips so you can be an exemplary horse-show exhibitor: Read the rest of this entry »

A Horse-Showing How-To: Pleasure Driving

April 16, 2014

Hang up the saddle and try your hand at a different kind of horse sport.

To maximize your chances of a safe pleasure drive, always check that your Quarter Horse is harnessed and hooked to the cart correctly.

To maximize your chances of a safe pleasure drive, always check that your Quarter Horse is harnessed and hooked to the cart correctly. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

It’s no secret that American Quarter Horses are a versatile breed. Many people think of Quarter Horses as a breed that excels in events like working cow horse and cutting, but they’re also used in dressage, over-fences classes and even pleasure driving. If you’ve considered trying the sport of pleasure driving, brush up on the basic rules and safety tips first so you can succeed in the show ring.

What is the purpose of pleasure driving anyway?

According to SHW610 of the 2014 AQHA Official Handbook, the purpose of this class is to evaluate the horse’s ability and pleasurable attitude while pulling a cart. Additionally, SHW610 offers these three standards:

Read the rest of this entry »

Supportive Horse Show Spouses

April 9, 2014

Learn how you can be a helpful horse-showing hand with these three tips from veteran show spouses.

As a horse show helper taking care of your spouse and the horses are only two parts of the equation Remember to schedule downtime for yourself too Got someone in mind who would make an excellent horse showing hand Share this story with him or her on Facebook

As a horse-show helper, taking care of your spouse and the horses are only two parts of the equation. Remember to schedule downtime for yourself, too. Journal illustration
Got someone in mind who would make an excellent horse-showing hand? Share this story with him or her on Facebook!

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

They are the backbone of the exhibitor. They are the ones who are there for the thrill of victory or the agony of defeat. They ensure that the horse is show-ring ready and the exhibitor is perfect.

They are show spouses. Always behind the scenes, show spouses are usually only recognized by their significant other for their contributions. The exhibitor gets all the glory for a win he wouldn’t necessarily have achieved without that lone person who groomed and exercised the horse and ensured that all the tack was clean and the exhibitor was spotless. Read the rest of this entry »

Preparing for Your Reining Debut

April 2, 2014

In Part 2 of this series about reining, discover what not to do in your horse-showing excursions.

Watching other riders compete in reining can tell you how the judges are scoring and teach you other horse training strategies

Watching other riders compete in reining can tell you how the judges are scoring and teach you other horse-training strategies. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

As you school your horse in the warm-up pen, you realize the competition is tough – really tough. It’s one of your first competitions and, as a novice rider, your heart is already pounding as you wait for your draw. You ponder last-minute miracle efforts that might bring your horse up to par with your rivals. You think you need a quick fix to contend because you know your horse can’t spin that fast and you know you’ve never run that hard.

Calm down, says Brent Wright, renowned reining horse trainer. Last-minute changes will only frustrate you and your horse. With this in mind, Brent shares additional strategies and tips for reinforcing your horse’s strengths, while also calming your horse-show nerves. Read the rest of this entry »

Preparing for Your Reining Debut

March 26, 2014

Examine these tips to optimize your horse-showing success in reining competition.

Upon entering a reining competition know your horses ability level and stick to it

Upon entering a reining competition, know your horse’s ability level and stick to it. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

As you school your horse in the warm-up pen, you realize the competition is tough – really tough. It’s one of your first competitions and, as a novice rider, your heart is already pounding as you wait for your draw. You ponder last-minute miracle efforts that might bring your horse up to par with your rivals.’ You think you need a quick fix to contend because you know your horse can’t spin that fast and you know you’ve never run that hard.

Calm down, says Brent Wright, renowned reining-horse trainer. Last-minute changes will only frustrate you and your horse.

A lot of people, myself included, get to the horse show and think they have to change their program,” says Brent of Ottawa, Kansas. “But it’s too late at that point to go changing things. Go with what you’ve got there.” Read the rest of this entry »

Smart Horse Showing: Haul Your Horse Safely

March 19, 2014

Help your show horse acclimate to different climates.

In cool weather, your horse will need the most help adjusting to the temperatures when he’s in his stall. Journal photo.

In cool weather, your horse will need the most help adjusting to the temperatures when he’s in his stall. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

One often-overlooked aspect of hauling performance horses to shows or other events is adjustment to changes in climate and altitude. Some changes don’t affect a horse severely, but others can zap him physically, change him mentally and cause poor performance.

Christian Rammerstorfer of Oroville, California, is a reining trainer who has a Ph.D. in equine nutrition and exercise physiology. He has hauled horses to several states where temperatures, humidity and altitude were extremely different from what the horses were used to at home. Read the rest of this entry »

Creating a Beneficial Horse-Showing Project for Youth

March 5, 2014

In Part 2 of this series, learn more tips for creating a positive horse-showing project for your child.

Parents should encourage their young horseback rider to set horse related goals regardless of their experience level

Parents should encourage their young horseback rider to set horse-related goals, regardless of their experience level. Journal photo.

By AQHA Professional Horseman Douglas Householder in The American Quarter Horse Journal

Once a kid is involved in a horse project, there are a few things will help ensure that blue ribbons aren’t the project’s only benefit. Utilizing horses as a developmental tool is far from an exact science. The following philosophy was gleaned from more than 20 years of work with moms and dads, 4-H volunteer leaders, youth-oriented horse trainers and, most importantly, kids.

In the previous post, we discussed six ways to make a child’s horse experience a success:

1. Be aware of the development stage of youth

2. Purchase horses to fit developmental stages of youth.

3. Commit yourself to your child’s project

4. Encourage youth to join horse organizations.

5. Help kids design a guiding road map.

6. Track your family’s progress.

Here are five additional important considerations: Read the rest of this entry »

Creating a Beneficial Horse-Showing Project for Youth, Part 1

February 26, 2014

Make your kids’ horse-showing experience positive with these six tips.

Both kids and parents should set goals for the horse showing project and determine how involved they want to be

Both kids and parents should set goals for the horse-showing project and determine how involved they want to be. Share this story on Facebook! Journal photo.

By AQHA Professional Horseman Douglas Householder in The American Quarter Horse Journal

Once a kid is involved in a horse project, there are a few things will help ensure that blue ribbons aren’t the project’s only benefit. Utilizing horses as a developmental tool is far from an exact science. The following philosophy was gleaned from more than 20 years of work with moms and dads, 4-H volunteer leaders, youth-oriented horse trainers and, most importantly, kids. Read the rest of this entry »