Horse Training, On the International Trail, The AQHA Intern Experience

Ground-Work Exercises That Relate to Horseback Riding

June 17, 2015

Katy Krshka shares four ground-work exercises from the AQHA international horsemanship camp in Austria.

Long View Ranch in Austria

By Katy Krshka, AQHA international intern, Summer 2015

Today, I am reporting from the beautiful countryside of Wilhelmsburg, Austria. We have started our three-day camp at Long View Ranch, owned and operated by Gerold and Gabriele Dautzenberg. They have been wonderful hosts to AQHA international horsemanship camps for 15 years. Their long list of accomplishments include multiple top-10 rankings in the world rankings in reining, trail, working cow horse and cutting, as well as European Championship titles. Their loft above their indoor arena is adorned with trophies over their years of involvement with the Austrian Quarter Horse Association and AQHA. The Dautzenbergs are a prime example of what hard work and dedication to your clients, association and American Quarter Horses can accomplish. Read the rest of this entry »

Train Your Brain, Part 1

June 16, 2015

Preparing for a horse show involves more than just horse training. It’s important to mentally and physically train yourself.

You and your horse might be physically fit to show, but nerves and insecurities can keep you from achieving your best. Journal photo

You and your horse might be physically fit to show, but nerves and insecurities can keep you from achieving your best. Journal photo

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Lainie DeBoer for The American Quarter Horse Journal

Whether it’s getting ready to compete at a weekend show or the AQHA World Championship Show, all too often we focus on the physical preparation – for ourselves and the horse – and we forget the mental preparation.

Yogi Berra once said, “Baseball is 90 percent mental and the other half physical.” The same is true for riding in a competition. Read the rest of this entry »

Training Horses, Training Kids

June 2, 2015

Take Me Riding educates kids about horse training for different western disciplines.

Jack watches a cowboy train his horse for cutting. Journal photo

Jack watches a cowboy train a horse for cutting. Journal photo

By Annise Montplaisir for America’s Horse Daily

American Quarter Horses are known far and wide for their strength and versatility. They can be trained for jumping, working cattle, roping, driving and various other disciplines. As kids learn more about horseback riding and training, they may choose to train for one or a few of these many disciplines. Each one is unique and requires a different set of skills.

Take Me Riding is a website developed to educate children about the wonderful learning experiences and fantastic opportunities that are available through horseback riding. The easy-to-navigate site is filled with educational horse facts, resources for parents and teachers, and fun games and videos – all designed to encourage kids to go riding! Read the rest of this entry »

Horse Training for a Challenge, Part 2

May 19, 2015

Tackling obstacles from the ground builds trust and confidence in your horse.

Mark Bolender demonstrates training his horse in the “junkyard” to practice maneuvering obstacles. Journal photo

Mark Bolender demonstrates training his horse in the “junkyard” to practice maneuvering obstacles. Journal photo

By AQHA Professional Horseman Mark Bolender in America’s Horse

AQHA Trail Challenges test a horse and rider’s ability to navigate through natural obstacles they might find in the wilderness. Starting with the basics ensures that everything needed for safety and success is in order.

In Part 1 of Training for a Challenge, readers learned the importance of establishing a respectful relationship with your horse when working from the ground. Part 2 will build on that relationship so you and your horse can develop trust and confidence in one another. Read the rest of this entry »

Horse Training for a Challenge, Part 1

May 5, 2015

Before competing in an AQHA Trail Challenge, utilize this horse-training advice to establish a partnership on the ground with your horse.

Mark Bolender longes his horses up and down hills, which teaches them to pick up their feet and navigate uneven ground. Journal photo

Mark Bolender longes his horses up and down hills, which teaches them to pick up their feet and navigate uneven ground. Journal photo

By AQHA Professional Horseman Mark Bolender in America’s Horse

AQHA Trail Challenges are a fun new way to earn official AQHA recognition, via merits, for horse-and-rider teamwork. A Trail Challenge is also a test of a horse and rider’s ability to navigate through natural obstacles they might find in the wilderness. And although it’s tempting to just get on and go, every horse and rider needs to start with the basics to ensure that everything needed for safety and success is in order. Read the rest of this entry »

Tracking Your Horse Straight, Part 2

April 21, 2015

Rating your horse’s speed and controlling circles and squares will improve showmanship performance. Follow these horse-training tips to learn how.

Train your horse to know that, where your body goes, he goes. Journal photo

Train your horse to know that, where your body goes, he goes. Journal photo

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Gretchen Mathes for The American Quarter Horse Journal

Tracking is the art of keeping your horse moving forward in a straight line. As you lead your horse forward, you must be able to maintain your horse’s body – poll, withers, tail – in a straight line. The horse shouldn’t curl his nose in toward you, track with his body sideways or bow his neck. Read the rest of this entry »

Tracking Your Horse Straight, Part 1

April 7, 2015

Utilize this horse-training advice to teach your halter or showmanship horse to track straight.

Tracking straight is important for the judge to properly evaluate your horse at halter. Journal photo

Tracking straight is important for the judge to properly evaluate your horse at halter. Journal photo

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Gretchen Mathes for The American Quarter Horse Journal

Tracking is the art of keeping your horse moving forward in a straight line. As you lead your horse forward, you must be able to maintain your horse’s body – poll, withers, tail – in a straight line. The horse shouldn’t curl his nose in toward you, track with his body sideways or bow his neck.

I show halter horses, and I start and train showmanship horses. The basics of tracking for both classes are the same. And it appears to me – as an AQHA judge - that many exhibitors in both classes need to practice it more. Read the rest of this entry »

Better Balance at the Lope and Canter, Part 2

March 24, 2015

Practice these horse-training exercises to improve rider balance and confidence.

When a rider is balanced with correct position, you should be able to look at him from behind and see the rider’s spine line up with the horse’s spine. Jean Abernethy illustration

When a rider is balanced with correct position, you should be able to look at him from behind and see the rider’s spine line up with the horse’s spine. Jean Abernethy illustration

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Lynn Palm in The American Quarter Horse Journal

In Part 1 of this series, you learned the importance of balance while horseback riding, and common horse-training problems that can hinder your balance. When you lose your balance, the natural tendency is to drop your eyes, allow your hands and arms to fall forward to catch you and tense your body. Part 2 will outline exercises to help improve your balance on a horse and techniques to stay relaxed and confident in the saddle.

Solutions

The key to improving balance is relentlessly practicing and perfecting position. And to get to that perfect position at the canter/lope, you first have to work on it at the walk and then the jog/trot. Read the rest of this entry »

Better Balance at the Lope and Canter, Part 1

March 10, 2015

Learn these common horse-training problems that affect horse and rider balance.

The horse’s center of gravity shifts with what he is doing. Good basic position helps a rider keep his own center of gravity in balance with the horse’s. Jean Abernethy illustration

The horse’s center of gravity shifts with what he is doing. Good basic position helps a rider keep his own center of gravity in balance with the horse’s. Jean Abernethy illustration

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Lynn Palm in The American Quarter Horse Journal

One of the most common problems people have is losing balance at the canter or lope.

It’s natural for that to happen. The canter is the most advanced of the three gaits to ride. You cover more ground and it takes concentration and requires a lot of balance.

When you bounce at the canter/lope, your seat is coming out of the saddle, Read the rest of this entry »

Developing an Elastic “Trampoline” Back, Part 2

March 3, 2015

Practice these horse-training exercises to develop a freely moving horse.

A horse with a locked back will feel as if his back is a board, stiff and unyielding, with no swing, no energy moving through. Jean Abernethy illustration

A horse with a locked back will feel as if his back is a board, stiff and unyielding, with no swing, no energy moving through. Jean Abernethy illustration

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Michelle Just-Williams

The development of a supple and elastic “trampoline” back is an important part of helping your horse become a gymnastic athlete under saddle.

A horse that is “through” is a horse that is moving freely from the back to the front. The hind legs push him forward, and that thrust of energy moves through him from the back to the front, like free-moving water through a canal. The swing from the hind legs jumps to his center of gravity, and he Read the rest of this entry »

Developing an Elastic “Trampoline” Back, Part 1

February 24, 2015

Heed these horse-training techniques to develop a freely-moving horse.

When a horse moves freely from the back to the front he engages his abdominal core muscles and lifts his back. The rider feels an elastic bounce, like bouncing on a trampoline. Jean Abernethy illustration

When a horse moves freely from the back to the front he engages his abdominal core muscles and lifts his back. The rider feels an elastic bounce, like bouncing on a trampoline. Jean Abernethy illustration

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Michelle Just-Williams

In dressage, we seek to gymnastically bring our horse through a full range of movement. We develop this using what we call the training pyramid. The pyramid is a guideline to develop a horse’s strength, power of impulsion and carrying power that eventually results in Read the rest of this entry »

Master the Flying Lead Change

February 17, 2015

Utilize these 10 horse-training tips to perfect your lead changes.

Timing is everything when performing a flying lead change. Journal photo

Timing is everything when performing a flying lead change. Journal photo

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Executing a flying lead change can take hard work and lots of practice. Follow these 10 horse-training tips that will put you and your horse on the road to success.

1. A proper lead change has nothing to do with direction. To be able to change leads properly in the front and hind legs simultaneously, a horse has to have his body and spine loping in the same direction.

2. Aim for a correct arc. All horses, when they lope or canter naturally, perform that gait with their body positioned in an arc. If a horse is out of position in his Read the rest of this entry »