Free Reports

Halter Horse Expression

October 4, 2011

Insider tips for getting expression from your halter horse.

In a ring full of wonderfully proportioned, beautiful Quarter Horses, the slightest details can make your horse stand out as the winner.

In AQHA’s FREE Halter Horse Expression report, you’ll learn the secrets to completing your horse’s “total look” in the halter arena. AQHA Professional Horseman Kathy Smallwood explains how to get your horse to present the facial expression the judges are looking for.

“Halter Horse Expression helped me understand how important expression is when showing my horse. Learning techniques to train and the timing of ques to show my horse at her peak potential is thrilling! Wow! What a competitive edge!

Each year I show, the competition is tougher. This article explains expression simply, in a way that is easily transferable to my horse, training for expression without overdoing it. This particular article helped me understand the importance of that balance between my horse being overly anxious or too relaxed. It is fantastic to receive tips and strategies from professionals who have been there. I can’t wait for show season to begin.”

AQHA Member Kim Nunn, Greenwood, Missouri

Kathy explains:

  • How to train your halter horse at home for good expression
  • Tools of the trade
  • Grooming tips to help improve and accentuate expression
  • How to get good expression from young halter horses
  • Ways to get the extra edge by using your horse’s natural energy

Learn it all in AQHA’s FREE report, Halter Horse Expression.

Download the Halter Horse Expression report for FREE!

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One of Kathy’s secrets:

“At home, give your horse a peppermint and be sure to unwrap it right in front of him so he associates the noise of the wrapper with getting the peppermint. Then, when you go in the show pen, put a little bit of the peppermint wrapping in your pocket and when you want to get expression, take it out and crinkle it through your fingers a little. It’ll get the horse’s ears up because he’s looking for the peppermint.

When you’re done showing, and you’re about to go out of the ring, give him the peppermint. Otherwise, he’ll lose interest.”