How to Build a Mounting Block

Ease aboard your horse with a homemade mounting block.

Ease aboard your horse with a homemade mounting block.

It’s always nice to have a leg up when you’re ready to get in the saddle. But there are many times when an able-bodied, strong-backed volunteer just isn’t available to give you a boost onto your horse.

AQHA consulted a woodworking expert for a homemade mounting block that can become a staple of your barn aisle or arena for years to come.

Download the easy directions in our FREE How to Build a Mounting Block report!

This homemade mounting block has a simple supply list and is the perfect project for beginners.

Make this mounting block your next 4-H project, or give the plans to the teenagers at your barn to keep them busy! Best of all, this mounting block is easily personalized with paint and decorations. What better gift to give your horse-loving friends than a homemade mounting block embellished with their name, horse brand, favorite horse club, equestrian team, whatever!

“As the director of a therapeutic riding center, we find our ramp and also a mounting block to be very necessary items. Even my able riders are asked to use the mounting block, as it is easier on our horses’ backs. I can’t imagine living without these very effective tools!”

Leslie

We know you’ll enjoy making this mounting block. Be sure to share your stories of how your new mounting block made your life a little easier and your ride a little more enjoyable!

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27 thoughts on “How to Build a Mounting Block”

  1. How about some dimensions/plans on how to build a mounting ramp for those of us who need a bit more stability and height, like you see at the shows for disabled riders.

    I’m vertically challenged and I purchased a 3-step plastic mounting block several years ago and found it to be tippy if one gets too close to the back, or tallest, edge of it. Not fun with a young horse where you need everything to be solid.

  2. I concur with Mary’s suggestion. As a disabled vetran I might build something taller too. I am ambulatory but a ramp or higher step would be easier on back and such.

  3. As the Director of a therapeutic riding center, we find our ramp & also a mounting block to be very necessary items. Even my able riders are asked to use the mounting step, as it is easier on our horse’s backs. I can’t imagine living without these very effective tools!

  4. I am almost 70 years old and now I have to get my horse close to the panel to get aboard but am always not around the panels. Thanks again for your help. This will be my project this next week-end after getting off work.
    Again thanks.

  5. A helper stirrup is an option. It is long than your regular stirrup and is terrific for those of us that have short legs and weak thigh muscles…not to mention a little too much weight!!

  6. Oh, the helper stirrup has a stirrup on one end and a loop to go over the saddle horn! Sorry, left that out of my last comment.

  7. I have had several mishaps while mounting and dismounting. I always triple check the cinch, but just last week I tore the offside billet while trying to mount. Both the horse and I were jumpy after that. I have also had the saddle slip as I dismounted I have a lower back injury that makes it difficult to mount quickly and have put on a “few” pounds over the years. Any suggestions on how to making mounting and dismounting safer for me and the horse would be helpful. Would a breast collar help in this situation? I use a mounting step when possible, however, there are situations where one is not available.

  8. Helpful info. Lucky me I discovered your site by chance, and I’m shocked why this twist of fate didn’t took place earlier! I bookmarked it.

  9. I like to add a third step and extend it into a platform to stand on. can be the same width as the steps which will be at the end. up the steps and onto the platform and if your horse moves forward or backward as they sometimes do, it is easy for you to move and not have to hop around on a step or get off and move the steps and try again. as much as we train our horses to stand for this process, sometimes it happens. more like the old fashioned mounting blocks. being vertically challenged and now ‘older’ I find this easier when getting on a taller horse.

  10. Anybody have a schematic to build an extra-tall mounting block (maybe around 32″) for my 18H Saddlebred? Actually. . the block is for me. . not him! I have fabulouse rides on him,- but disasters getting down afterward. . much to his chagrin. Thank you for any help!

  11. Teaching your horse to kneel so you can mount when a platform or a mounting block isn’t available (like out on the trails) is very helpful.

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