October 2013

Rid Your Horse of a Dry, Itchy Coat

October 28, 2013

Rule out parasites as the cause of your horse’s dry coat and itchiness and learn to supplement for improved coat condition.

ask_expertQuestion:

I have a mare with anhydrous, which I am treating with a product with success, but I am still dealing with a dry coat and itching. I use a coat conditioning supplement in her feed but still struggle. Any suggestions?

For the answer, we sought advice from the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

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Tricks to Treat a Thinning Mane

October 7, 2013

Learn the most common causes of skin conditions that result in a horse’s thinning, flaking mane.

ask_expertQuestion:

Through the years, I have had several horses, or have noticed clients’ horses, that lose mane hair on the underside of the mane. This causes a thin mane.

The area is slightly flaky but does not appear red or inflamed. The flakiness does not appear to be more than what is normal for horses with thick manes. With these horses there is no history of rubbing this area of the neck. The condition does not appear to bother the horse at all.

Any ideas what causes this or if there is a way to encourage mane hair growth in this area when the thinning occurs?

For the answer, we sought advice from the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

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Top 10 Trending Articles

October 4, 2013

Check out the 10 most popular articles on America’s Horse Daily this month!

TwobitTeeblack1-300x276Grooming for the big AQHA world show in November, caring for frustrating skin conditions or trying to solve the horse ponying phenomenon – whatever your interest, America’s Horse Daily has some of the best information a horseman could dream of.

America’s Horse Daily supplies daily articles to aid horsemen in their quest to become better trainers, riders, owners and teammates to their American Quarter Horse. Check out the top trending articles from this month’s posts.

  1. One in a Million: Part 2 – An incredible genetic circumstance creates a unique DNA puzzle. A chimera is an individual formed from two different cell lines. Confused? Learn about one such horse, Dunbar Gold, a brindle stallion with this unique genetic situation.
  2. 2014 Calendar Contest Winners – Who doesn’t enjoy an adorable picture of a kid with her horse? Or a picturesque landscape with horses grazing in the distance? Find photos just like these among the winning photos from the 2014 AQHA Calendar Contest.
  3. Pastern Dermatitis – This skin condition goes by many names: scratches, mud fever, grease heel, grapes and others. But, they are all forms of pastern dermatitis, a skin reaction with a multitude of causes. Learn some of the causes, treatments and most effective prevention here. 
  4. Master the Solid Box – AQHA Professional Horsewoman Nancy Cahill offers effective progression exercises and tips to train a horse for the solid box turn in trail class.
  5. Grass Founder – Turning the herd out to graze might seem like a great idea when the weather is less-than-ideal for riding and the horses are fresh, but lush grass comes with its own set of hazards. Too much of a good thing can be a bad thing if it turns into a founder problem. Learn more about grass founder and laminitis here.
  6. Horse-Showing Shine, Part 1 Making a great impression in the show ring starts with a flawless appearance. Focus on your horse’s skin and hair coat to keep him looking his best in the arena.
  7. The Power of PonyingFrom saving time to instilling patience and quietness in a horse, ponying can be an effective tool for any horseman. AQHA Professional Horseman and judge Steve Meadows teaches you the tricks to train your horse to pony.
  8. What Is Colic? Nearly every horse suffers from colic at some point in his lifetime. Learn to recognize signs and symptoms early to avoid an expensive vet visit or worse.
  9. Grooming Tips for Horses Grooming is an important part of horse care. It improves the health of the skin and coat, decreases the chances of a variety of health problems and improves the relationship between caregivers and their horses. Enjoy some helpful grooming tips from AQHA Corporate Partner Tractor Supply Co.
  10. Stallion in Training -- Danny Salsman has extensive experience teaching young stallions to accept the breeding dummy. He offers his advice on non-stressful tips to encourage novice breeding studs to become comfortable in the breeding shed and learn their job.

And it doesn’t stop there! Access hundreds of articles at America’s Horse Daily for even more invaluable information.

Grooming Tips for Horses

September 25, 2013

Proper grooming is a crucial part to the overall horse show ready appearance. Journal photo.

Proper grooming is a crucial of part the overall horse show ready appearance. Journal photo.

Get ready for horse-showing success.

From AQHA Corporate Partner Tractor Supply Co.

Grooming is an important part of horse care, especially for horses who are used in competition or show. Regular grooming improves the health of the skin and coat, decreases the chances of various health problems, such as thrush and skin problems, and helps to build a relationship between horse and handler. Get your horse show-ready with these helpful grooming tips.

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Horse-Showing Shine, Part II

September 18, 2013

It takes a healthy hair coat to sparkle in the show ring.

Proper care and conditioning will create a healthy hair coat show you and your partner can sparkle in the show ring. Journal photo.

Proper care and conditioning will create a healthy hair coat so that you and your partner can sparkle in the show ring. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

The quest for the perfect show appearance can take its toll on a horse’s skin and coat. Over-grooming, harsh products and the side effects of intense training can leave the coat a little dull. Learn better methods to create a show ready appearance that also keeps your horse healthy.

In Part 1, you learned that proper nutrition is crucial to develop healthy coat and condition from the inside out. Now, Dr. Rosanna Marsella, a professor of veterinary dermatology at the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, shares tips and advice on keeping your show horse’s skin in top condition by managing chemical damage and common skin problems.

What’s in the Bottle?

To help our horses look their best, we use a wide variety of topical grooming aids, such as detanglers, stain removers, coat polishes, highlighters and fly repellants. If not used with care, they can negatively affect the skin.

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Pastern Dermatitis

September 12, 2013

This horse-health issue goes by many names and has many causes.

Scratches, also known as mud fever or mud rash, is the mildest and most prevalent form of pastern dermatitis. Journal photo.

Scratches, also known as mud fever or mud rash, is the mildest and most prevalent form of pastern dermatitis. Journal photo.

By Dr. Thomas R. Lenz in The American Quarter Horse Journal

Wet weather during the winter and spring combined with longer hair that traps moisture and dirt on most horses’ lower legs are ideal conditions for pastern dermatitis.

Pastern dermatitis is not a single disease, but a skin reaction with a variety of causes. Most cases are due to bacterial infection, but other causes include irritation from caustic substances, mites, fungal infection, allergies and photosensitization related to exposure to clover pastures or toxic weeds. Dermatitis due to photosensitization only affects the white hair and pink skin areas on the horse’s leg and is easily differentiated from other causes of the disease. Some draft breeds (Clydesdales and Shires) suffer from immune-mediated problems that have a genetic component that predisposes them to the condition, but this form of the disease is extremely rare in light breeds such as the American Quarter Horse.

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Horse-Showing Shine, Part 1

September 11, 2013

Keep your horse’s skin and hair coat looking their best to make an impression in the show ring.

Keep your horses skin and appearance in top shape to impress the judges in the show ring. Journal photo.

Keep your horses skin and appearance in tip top condition to impress the judges in the show ring. Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal.

A life on the competition road presents a number of challenges to a horse’s skin and coat. Dampness from sweating and baths, the demands of training and showing, and harsh substances in some grooming products all contribute to skin problems such as flaking, itching, a dull coat and infections.

In this two-part series, learn how to keep your show horses looking their best by providing proper nutrition, avoiding harsh chemicals and recognizing the signs and symptoms of over-grooming.

Beauty From the Inside Out

A balanced diet is vital to keeping your American Quarter Horse’s skin healthy. Skin and hair lacking necessary nutrients will not function properly. They are also more susceptible to damage and infections.

There are some specific vitamins and minerals that will ensure that your horse feels and looks his best.

Biotin helps metabolize the fats and proteins essential for skin and coat health. Inadequate biotin levels may result in dryness, flaking, fungal infections, a fine and brittle coat or hair loss.

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Horsemanship Is a Journey

September 9, 2013

When it comes to horseback riding, there are many different paths and different goals, but we can keep learning.

Kris and Brent Graef have a lot of tips to help you bring your horsemanship to the next level. Journal photo.

Kris and Brent Graef have a lot of tips to help you bring your horsemanship to the next level. Journal photo.

By Brent Graef  in America’s Horse

We each have different goals with our horses. We each have different skills, coordination, flexibility, knowledge and understanding of horses. We each have different situations – work, family, distance to our horses – and there are only so many hours in a day. Some folks only get to spend time with their horse once a week, once every two weeks or less. Some folks get to spend time with their horse every day.

I think the quality of the time we get to spend with our horse is a very important factor. Sure, it would be great to ride all day every day, but not many people get to do that. Set your priorities and the time that you can allot to your horse, and make it count, whether it’s just a few minutes of grooming or hanging out with him or whether it’s steady riding.

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A Twitch in a Tube

September 5, 2013

An oral sedative gel can help with grooming and basic horse-health procedures.

Farrier

An oral sedative might be just the solution to make daily tasks an easier experience for horses. Photo courtesy of Danvers Child with the Journal.

From AQHA Corporate Partner Zoetis

Grooming and basic health care procedures are part of the routine for horse owners. Often, so is dealing with an unruly horse.

Horses can soar over fences and work whole herds of cattle. Yet body clipping and shoeing can sometimes be difficult to accomplish. For these simple procedures, a standing sedative can help. Here’s how.

You may need a sedative for your anxious horse while clipping, mane pulling, changing bandages or for farrier work. Sedation produces muscle relaxation and reduces excitement. This allows basic health care procedures to be completed and may help decrease the risk of injury, for example, when a horse is turned out in the field after a period of stall rest.

Zoetis helps make all of this safer for you and less stressful for your horse with DORMOSEDAN GEL® (detomidine hydrochloride). Think of it as a humane “twitch in a tube.” Horse owners must obtain it with a veterinary prescription but can administer it themselves.

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A Good Fit

July 17, 2013

Using a slinky is a great horse-showing strategy, but it has to fit correctly.

The blue slinky on top fits the horse well, while the patterned slinky on bottom is too large for the horse. AQHA Professional Horsewoman Margo Ball shows you how to properly fit a slinky on your horse. Journal photo.

The blue slinky on top fits the horse well, while the patterned slinky on bottom is too large for the horse. AQHA Professional Horsewoman Margo Ball shows you how to properly fit a slinky on your horse. Journal photo.

By AQHA Professional Horsewoman Margo Ball with Christine Hamilton in The American Quarter Horse Journal

Chances are good that you’ve either used a slinky on your horse or have at least considered using one. AQHA Professional Horsewoman Margo Ball has more than 25 years of experience under her belt and knows what to look for when fitting a slinky.

“I like to band my horses’ manes the night before I show so I’m not so rushed the next morning,” Margo says. “But that strategy only works if you can keep those bands protected. A big part of keeping the bands in place is having a slinky that fits and is comfortable to your horse. The most common mistake I see people make is using a slinky that is too large.” Read the rest of this entry »

Bathing Beauty

June 20, 2013

Bath time is a great time to assess horse health and keep your horse’s coat gleaming.

Bathe your horse thoroughly on the day before the big event. Journal photo.

Bathe your horse thoroughly on the day before a horse show or big event. Journal photo.

From AQHA Corporate Partner Farnam

Bathing is a great opportunity to bond with your horse and assess any health conditions that may escape your attention during regular grooming. The answer to the question “How often should I bathe my horse?” varies, depending on your activity, showing schedule, weather and environment. Oftentimes, a thorough rinsing to remove sweat and loose hair is enough to keep your horse’s coat and skin healthy, and over-shampooing may cause dry skin and coat conditions.

For those times when a shampoo is in order, have on hand a rubber currycomb, sweat scraper, gentle horse shampoo, mane and tail detangler, hose, sponge, towel and bucket of water. When using shampoo, it’s important to use only products specifically made for bathing horses, as other products can deplete essential natural oils and dull the hair coat. Read the rest of this entry »

Make Your Lights Bright

May 22, 2013

Horse showing with a light-colored horse? It’s hard, but not impossible, to keep those whites clean.

Reining horse

Follow these helpful tips for keeping your light-colored horse clean and shiny! Journal photo.

From The American Quarter Horse Journal

Washing your light-colored horse is like doing laundry – just when you get caught up, you have to start over from the beginning. It’s not that light-colored horses get any dirtier than a sorrel or a bay, it’s just that they show every stain or spot.

We’ve all been there. You polish up your palomino, gray or buckskin and are ready for the show. You get everything packed and ready to go, and then you go grab your light-colored horse to load into the trailer. But when you get to your horse’s stall, you are instantly dismayed to see either stains you missed or new ones your horse just made.

Never fear, the Journal is here to provide helpful hints to make it easier to get and keep your light-colored horse sparkling clean. Read the rest of this entry »